PANIC AND ANXIETY CONDITIONS

When a person becomes anxious or starts to panic, the pulse rate increases, the palms of the hands may become sweaty, muscles tense and the mind and emotions become singularly focused on the anxiety-causing event or situation. Another physiological change in the body at this time is an increase in the rate and depth of breathing. We go into what is referred to as the ‘Fight or Flight’ state. This is a normal response to stress.

In a person with a normal anxiety response, once the anxiety-causing event has passed the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems return the body to normal physiological baselines.

If a chronic state of hyperventilation exists (that is, the person breathes more than the physiologically required 4-5 litres per minute all or much of the time) then this will trigger changes in the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems producing a chronic state of anxiety. The person will feel as if they are permanently in a state of ‘Fight or Flight’ and have a permanently elevated level of anxiety.

Hyperventilation and anxiety form a ‘vicious circle’, one leading to the other. The process may be ‘pushed’ or initiated from either end. One person may experience anxiety which then leads to hyperventilation, another person may hyperventilate leading to feelings of rising anxiety and/or panic. One feeds the other in an increasing spiral.

The Breathing Retraining Course breaks this vicious circle by teaching people how to correct the permanent elevated level of anxiety bringing breathing rates back to normal and thereby reducing the resultant anxiety and panic. Once their breathing is back to a normal level they no longer have to live constantly in the ‘Fight or Flight’ state. Their body is able to return to normal after cessation of the anxiety-causing event.

Doctors may be good with medications, Psychologists may be good for counselling and various forms of therapy and are able to work with people to help with problems like depression, relationship breakdowns and grief, however rarely do they help you with the physical debilitation caused by long term anxiety and any breathing advice they give is always at best a) short term and symptomatic or b) harmful (eg deep breathing)

The Breathing Retraining course provides a breakthrough because it does 2 things: 

1) Resets the Breathing driver so any little stress does not escalate to panic while really improving sleep quality

2) Clearly gives you the correct things to do to circumvent the panic symptoms so you can feel calmer and in more control.

Retraining your breathing can break the spiral and teach you how to get back in control … Corey was only 28yrs …sums this up quite well …

“I had reached a critical time in my life regarding my breathing. For years since some very stressful periods of life I was hyperventilating thinking the whole time that breathing deeper would calm me down. But it did not. By chance I read an article in the alternative publication, Nexus magazine discussing the Buteyko Method.

I was at the stage where I would feel like passing out, getting pins and needles in my head and other parts of my body and suffering high anxiety. Then I came to this site and got directed to a Buteyko Breathing course coming up in my area, run by Brian Firth.

After completing this course, I am pleased to say that my anxiety is at least 90% better. The circulation in my legs has improved dramatically and I don’t have the allergic responses to dairy products that I used to. For such a simple set of techniques, the Buteyko method has changed my life.

Now I feel in control. Now I feel calm and clear.”

Corey 28 Seven Hills, Sydney

Michael Slater – Ex Australian Cricket player and Chanel 9 commentator

Enough Rope interview with Andrew Denton, ABC 2005

ANDREW DENTON: If you’d known about bipolar II earlier, do you think things might have been different for you?

MICHAEL SLATER: Yeah, I mean, there’s, you know, a fairly big thing that we’ve sort of skipped over, and what sort of led me as well down to seeking professional help, I suppose, was that in the year 2000, when I was in England, the first opportunity I had at commentating, I developed panic attacks out of the blue, and I’ve always been my own worst enemy, and this sort of perfectionist attitude and I’d just started the commentary stint. I saw it as a unique opportunity. And I just was so nervous so uptight about it, and after the first day’s commentating, I thought I’d done an absolute crap job. So I came back to my hotel and I didn’t feel great, and then bang! That night I had my first ever full-blown panic attack, was rushed to hospital, thought I was having a heart attack. And then nothing for a month.

I got back into everything, and then I had my second one, and that was even more intense than the first. Once again, rushed to hospital. Thought I was having a heart attack. Then, for the next two weeks, I was sort of housebound in a darkened room, having several panic attacks a day, and it just this fear of having another… It was fear of having another panic attack, you know, this feeling of impending doom and that I was actually going to die, maybe, from one of these, even though every time I was rushed to the hospital, it was, “No, you’re normal. We don’t know what’s going on.”. I got them under control when I got back for the 2000-2001 cricket season. But at that time, Andrew, I felt that every day, I was going to die. Every day was my last day. That’s how drastically it affected me. And I’m sure, people watching…some people can relate to that. When you feel that every day you’re going to die, you gotta hurry up and get things moving. You gotta do things in your life before you’re no longer here. And that was certainly around the time, too, when I’d left Stephanie. had a Ferrari account. One of my passions in life is cars. Unfortunately, ’cause it’s a ridiculously expensive passion.

Typically, modern medicine does little for people experiencing panic attacks, often they are monitored and and all kinds of checks are done in hospital and the attacks keep happening. The Breathing Retraining Course breaks this vicious circle by teaching people how to correct the permanent elevated level of anxiety bringing breathing rates back to normal and thereby reducing the resultant anxiety and panic. Once their breathing is back to a normal level they no longer have to live constantly in the ‘Fight or Flight’ state. Their body is able to return to normal after cessation of the anxiety-causing event

CONTACT DETAILS

Brian Firth, B.Sc. Melb, Dip Ed
Sec Buteyko Institute of Breathing & Health

BRIAN FIRTH

Buteyko Health, 273 Riding Rd
Balmoral Qld 4171 Australia 

 

Phone: 0413 482 765
Int: +61413 482 765

CONTACT ME

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